White Reporter Complains About Black Turnout at 2022 CMT Music Awards: "It's Not Wakanda" [Video]

Patrick Howley is a right-wing reporter you wouldn’t know or follow unless you’re a person who thinks falling in a mud hole counts as a bath and you still get upset because your high school Klan robe doesn’t fit anymore.

via: Revolt

The white right-wing reporter is bothered by the number of Black people who attended the 2022 CMT Awards.

The annual award show went down on Monday (April 11), honoring some of the best in country music this year. The event was co-hosted by Anthony Mackie, a Black man, and featured appearances from Black people who simply showed up to have a good time. The turnout of Blacks at the show caught the attention of Patrick Howley, who griped about their presence while reporting on the event.

“I don’t know who this Black guy is who’s hosting it. It’s supposed to be country music,” he said of Mackie. “No offense. I mean, y’all have hip hop and basketball. You know what I mean. Just fly with your flock, bro.”

As he played a clip of Mackie on stage, Howley spoke over the audio and seemingly mocked Black people. “The melanated people invented country music!” he teased. “We was making country music in Wakanda before Johnny Cash and Merle Haggard done stole the Black man’s country music!”

The suspected nationalist then continued on with his complaints, concluding that there were just too many Black people at the CMT Awards for his liking. “There were so many Black people there,” he said. “Sorry to say, but so many Black celebrities who have nothing to do with country music and it’s like— why?”

Howley attempted to prove that he is not against Blacks by mentioning some of the Black celebrities of whom he’s a fan. Still, he maintained that the CMT Awards was not the right setting for all those Black people. “No disrespect to the funky brothers,” he said. “I love Earth Wind & Fire, Run-D.M.C., etc. But country music’s different. It’s not Wakanda.”

See a clip of Howley’s rant below.

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